Close cookie details

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav
Abraham Lincoln
Cover of Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
A Life 1855-1858: Building a New Party, a House Divided and the Lincoln Douglas Debates
Borrow Borrow

Publishers Weekly describes this book as "the most meticulously researched Lincoln biography ever written. Burlingame's Lincoln comes alive as the author unfolds vast amounts of new research while breathing new life into familiar stories. It is the essential title for the bicentennial." Publishers Weekly also notes, "The book need not be heard in one sitting. Each part stands alone." Now Gildan Media brings to you, chapter by chapter, what Doris Kearns Goodwin calls a "…profound and masterful portrait."

Building a New Party, a House Divided and the Lincoln Douglas Debates ( 1855-1858)

"Unite With Us and Help Us to Triumph" – Building the Illinois Republican Party ( 1855-1857)

Lincoln struggles to form a new party to take the place of the defunct Whig party. He has strong doubts that a peaceful end to slavery is possible. Joining with anti-slavery, anti-nativist forces, Lincoln launches the Republican Party of Illinois and the first Republican convention takes place. Supporting a non-radical anti-slavery platform Lincoln intervenes between radicals and conservatives to settle disputes at the convention. When the Dred Scott case is decided, Lincoln publicly denounces the court decision. His finest debates with Stephen A. Douglass take place and Lincoln calls into question the hypocrisy of the Southern disgust of race mixing, as the population of Southern mulattos "dwarfed" that of the north.

"A House Divided" Lincoln vs. Douglass (1857-1858)

Stephen Douglass vies for Republican support and begins to deny his affiliations with Democrats, stating that he had planned to curtail the spread of slavery geographically by building a railroad. Yet as late as 1858, Douglass wrote often of his belief, which had historical precedent, that blacks were not self-governing citizens and could not be granted passports. Lincoln saw him as a threat in that Douglas' views were able to win Republicans and at the same time woo Democrats. During this time, Lincoln delivers his famous "house divided" speech in which he claims that slavery must either exist or cease to exist in all territories.

"A David Greater than the Democratic Goliath" –the Lincoln-Douglas Debates 1858

Despite Douglass being more popular than Lincoln, he lost many supporters due to strong and growing anti-slavery sentiments, a dwindling support from the Whig party, and a general dissatisfaction with the Democrat party. Douglass arrived well dressed for the debates with horse-drawn carriages and bands, whereas Lincoln would arrive quietly by train, and in very shabby clothing. Douglass often took to misquoting and lying, which local newspapers noted, sparking harsh criticism of him. The press also purposefully published inaccurate transcriptions of Lincoln's speeches. Democratic election fraud was largely at play as Republicans failed to gain control of the legislature although the Republican popular vote was larger than it had been in 1856.

Publishers Weekly describes this book as "the most meticulously researched Lincoln biography ever written. Burlingame's Lincoln comes alive as the author unfolds vast amounts of new research while breathing new life into familiar stories. It is the essential title for the bicentennial." Publishers Weekly also notes, "The book need not be heard in one sitting. Each part stands alone." Now Gildan Media brings to you, chapter by chapter, what Doris Kearns Goodwin calls a "…profound and masterful portrait."

Building a New Party, a House Divided and the Lincoln Douglas Debates ( 1855-1858)

"Unite With Us and Help Us to Triumph" – Building the Illinois Republican Party ( 1855-1857)

Lincoln struggles to form a new party to take the place of the defunct Whig party. He has strong doubts that a peaceful end to slavery is possible. Joining with anti-slavery, anti-nativist forces, Lincoln launches the Republican Party of Illinois and the first Republican convention takes place. Supporting a non-radical anti-slavery platform Lincoln intervenes between radicals and conservatives to settle disputes at the convention. When the Dred Scott case is decided, Lincoln publicly denounces the court decision. His finest debates with Stephen A. Douglass take place and Lincoln calls into question the hypocrisy of the Southern disgust of race mixing, as the population of Southern mulattos "dwarfed" that of the north.

"A House Divided" Lincoln vs. Douglass (1857-1858)

Stephen Douglass vies for Republican support and begins to deny his affiliations with Democrats, stating that he had planned to curtail the spread of slavery geographically by building a railroad. Yet as late as 1858, Douglass wrote often of his belief, which had historical precedent, that blacks were not self-governing citizens and could not be granted passports. Lincoln saw him as a threat in that Douglas' views were able to win Republicans and at the same time woo Democrats. During this time, Lincoln delivers his famous "house divided" speech in which he claims that slavery must either exist or cease to exist in all territories.

"A David Greater than the Democratic Goliath" –the Lincoln-Douglas Debates 1858

Despite Douglass being more popular than Lincoln, he lost many supporters due to strong and growing anti-slavery sentiments, a dwindling support from the Whig party, and a general dissatisfaction with the Democrat party. Douglass arrived well dressed for the debates with horse-drawn carriages and bands, whereas Lincoln would arrive quietly by train, and in very shabby clothing. Douglass often took to misquoting and lying, which local newspapers noted, sparking harsh criticism of him. The press also purposefully published inaccurate transcriptions of Lincoln's speeches. Democratic election fraud was largely at play as Republicans failed to gain control of the legislature although the Republican popular vote was larger than it had been in 1856.

Available formats-
  • OverDrive Listen
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you

Reviews-
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin "Lincoln scholars have waited anxiously for this book for decades. Its triumphant publication proves it was well worth the wait. Few scholars have written with greater insight about the psychology of Lincoln. No one in recent history has uncovered more fresh sources than Michael Burlingame. This profound and masterful portrait will be read and studied for years to come."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Gildan Media
  • OverDrive Listen
    Release date:
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
    Burn to CD: 
    Permitted
    Transfer to device: 
    Permitted
    Transfer to Apple® device: 
    Permitted
    Public performance: 
    Not permitted
    File-sharing: 
    Not permitted
    Peer-to-peer usage: 
    Not permitted
    All copies of this title, including those transferred to portable devices and other media, must be deleted/destroyed at the end of the lending period.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 5 titles every 10 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
A Life 1855-1858: Building a New Party, a House Divided and the Lincoln Douglas Debates
Michael Burlingame
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel